Christopher J. Moore



Chris Moore is a RPWB attorney who helps people resolve complex legal disputes, including catastrophic personal injury, class actions, products liability and vehicle defect cases.

Born and raised in Goldsboro, North Carolina, Moore studied political science at North Carolina State University. He attended the Charleston School of Law and began clerking for RPWB in the summer after his second year. In October 2008, he became an associate at the firm.

Moore is an avid tennis player and golfer. He briefly worked as an assistant golf pro in Raleigh before pursuing a career in the law. He and his wife, Mary Wallace, live in Columbia with their young daughter, DeBerry.

2008, South Carolina

2009, U.S. District Court, District of South Carolina

2010, U.S. Court of Appeals, Fourth Circuit

Charleston School of Law, J.D., cum laude, 2008

North Carolina State University, B.A., 2003

Federal Courts Law Review, Student Works Editor

American Association for Justice

South Carolina Association for Justice

South Carolina Bar

Vehicle Defect Cases

Moore has successfully litigated many vehicle defect cases in which vehicle occupants were severely injured or killed in wrecks. This includes: a client paralyzed as a result of a truck roll-over; a young mother killed in a low-impact collision due to a defectively designed fuel system; a client who is wheelchair bound from injuries suffered as a result of a defectively-designed car seat; and individuals injured by defectively designed tractor-trailers.

E-Cigarette Explosions and Other Burn Injuries

RPWB has a long history of representing burn injury victims. Moore is part of the team that has litigated product liability cases against the manufacturers of gas cans, grills, vehicles, electronic cigarettes, personal vaporizers, lithium-ion batteries, and other products. Moore is leading the effort to hold the manufacturers of e-cigarettes and other devices powered by lithium-ion batteries liable for explosions that continue to injure many people throughout the country.

Delores Williams v. GEICO, 409 S.C. 586 (2014)

Moore successfully argued against the legality of family step-down provisions in automobile insurance policies in South Carolina. The case involved a husband and wife who died when their car was struck by a train in Richland County, South Carolina. Instead of paying the stated per person coverage, the insurance company had a clause in its contract stating that if the injured person is a family member of the driver, the policy would only pay the minimum level of coverage allowed by state law, $15,000 at the time. Moore wrote the appellate briefs and argued the case in front of the South Carolina Supreme Court which invalidated family member step-down clauses, finding such clauses violate the public policy of South Carolina.